FAQs

How can therapy be helpful?

Working with a therapist in a safe, supportive space can help grow and heal relationships; improve ability to understand, express, and manage emotions; develop better ways to cope with difficult or painful situations; and identify parts of life you can control or try to change and parts that you may need to work toward accepting.

Therapy can be beneficial whether you are seeking treatment for an ongoing issue, or you are simply looking for someone to help you work through a particularly difficult situation or time in your life.

It is important to remember that it usually takes time and effort to see improvement and change. Therapy is most effective when clients have an open mind and actively participate in the process.

Should I engage in therapy or take medication? Do you prescribe medication?

Research is clear that medication alone is not a long term solution for many mental health concerns. Instead of just treating the symptom(s), psychotherapy helps us understand why we are distressed and begin moving towards healthier behaviors, emotions, attitudes, and relationships. Medication, in addition to psychotherapy, can sometimes be the right course of treatment for certain issues. I am not a medical practitioner, but can provide referrals for psychiatric care if you would like to explore medication in addition to therapy.

Are my sessions confidential?

In general, the law protects the confidentiality of all communications between a client and psychotherapist. No information is disclosed without prior written permission from the client. However, there are some exceptions required by law to this rule. Exceptions include: suspected child abuse, dependent adult or elder abuse; imminent threat of serious bodily harm to a specific person; and imminent risk to self and/or imminent threat of suicide.